PREPA Bondholders Seek Summary Judgment Invalidating Puerto Rico’s Public Corporation Bankruptcy Legislation

Author:Mr Leonard Weiser-Varon and William Kannel
Profession:Mintz, Levin, Cohn, Ferris, Glovsky and Popeo, P.C.
 
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On August 11, Franklin Funds and Oppenheimer Rochester Funds filed a second amended complaint, opposition to motion to dismiss and cross-motion for summary judgment in the litigation they previously filed in the United States District Court for Puerto Rico challenging the constitutionality and validity of Puerto Rico's so-called Recovery Act.  The second amended complaint reiterates that a PREPA filing under the Recovery Act, which establishes debt adjustment procedures for most of Puerto Rico's public corporations, is both "probable and imminent."  The motion seeks summary judgment on two of the plaintiffs' claims: that the Recovery Act is constitutionally and statutorily preempted, and that the Recovery Act's automatic stay provisions are illegal to the extent they purport to preclude a federal court action.  The motion asserts that these two claims are "purely legal, and will not be clarified by further factual development."

The summary judgment motion re-enforces our prior assessment that, once the court is persuaded to address the merits, one of the plaintiffs' strongest arguments is that Section 903 of the federal Bankruptcy Code precludes enforcement of any Recovery Act debt adjustment against non-consenting bondholders.

The motion, referencing legislative history and prior case law,  effectively dispenses with Puerto Rico's relatively weak arguments that Section 903 cannot or should not be read as applicable to Puerto Rico's public corporations.   Puerto Rico has argued that Congress could not have intended to leave its public instrumentalities without access to any debt adjustment process, which, given Puerto Rico's express exclusion from eligibility under Chapter 9 of the Bankruptcy Code, would be the effect of  applying Section 903 to Puerto Rico's own public corporation insolvency legislation.  Whether Congress indeed intended to leave Puerto Rico in such a predicament is unclear.  The plaintiff's brief suggests that because Puerto Rico's bonds, unlike any state's bonds,  benefit from nationwide triple tax-exemption (which accounts for Puerto Rico's status as the third highest volume issuer of tax-exempt bonds after California and New York), "Congress did not want Puerto Rico to restructure its municipal debt through either its own laws or Chapter 9."  Whether this or any other rationale for Puerto Rico's statutory treatment under the Bankruptcy Code exists, the plaintiffs' motion argues that the statutory language in Chapter 9...

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